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Topic: Anyone have Martin Mull CDs?

Started by: Dbdash2000

Dbdash2000   Offline  -  Member  -  08-07-09 10:22 PM  -  9 years ago
fiogf49gjkf0d
I hadn't realized that one was still available. Thanks! Too bad I can't get "Days of Wine and Neuroses" or "Normal" on CD.

jmanforever:
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Collector's Choice has the 1977 album "I'm Everyone I've Ever Loved" on CD for $12.98

www.ccmusic.com/item.cfm?itemid=LGH11202
jmanforever   Offline  -  Member  -  08-07-09 05:37 PM  -  9 years ago
fiogf49gjkf0d
Collector's Choice has the 1977 album "I'm Everyone I've Ever Loved" on CD for $12.98

www.ccmusic.com/item.cfm?itemid=LGH11202
Dbdash2000   Offline  -  Member  -  08-05-09 11:23 PM  -  9 years ago
fiogf49gjkf0d
Pre Amps are a must for any kind of transfer! Very important. I'm going off of one of those Target Brand Turntables, since my old one died horribly. I've considered the USB Turntable route though; thanks for all the tips here.

I'm also in the broadcast industry, but mostly TV stuff, though I have done some audio work with transferring tapes to digital formats. It seems a lot different than transferring a vinyl. I have Audacity; I really like it. Great audio editor. I'll try some of this and let you guys know if I can get good quality transfers of my Martin Mull LPs.

Thanks!

Bob Guest:
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Most 78s, especially older ones, need the extra width of the 78 needle to play properly and reduce background noise.


fm123:
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I still have my old Technics direct drive turntable. It's nice and quiet, no belt to worry about, which usually stretches after a few years. The only problem is it won't play 78's. I have solved that problem by playing them at 45RPM then speeding up the wave file using Audacity.
Bob Guest   Offline  -  Artist  -  08-05-09 11:07 PM  -  9 years ago
fiogf49gjkf0d
Most 78s, especially older ones, need the extra width of the 78 needle to play properly and reduce background noise.


fm123:
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I still have my old Technics direct drive turntable. It's nice and quiet, no belt to worry about, which usually stretches after a few years. The only problem is it won't play 78's. I have solved that problem by playing them at 45RPM then speeding up the wave file using Audacity.
fm123   Offline  -  Participant  -  08-05-09 11:03 PM  -  9 years ago
fiogf49gjkf0d
I still have my old Technics direct drive turntable. It's nice and quiet, no belt to worry about, which usually stretches after a few years. The only problem is it won't play 78's. I have solved that problem by playing them at 45RPM then speeding up the wave file using Audacity.
jmanforever   Offline  -  Member  -  08-05-09 08:45 PM  -  9 years ago
fiogf49gjkf0d
One problem I have seen with people trying to hook up their old turntable to a computer is that they forget a pre-amp is needed. You can't just plug a turntable directly into a computer, it won't work. What you need to do is run the turntable through your stereo system, and plug the "Tape Out" jack from your receiver or integrated amp into the sound card input.

Tim, you are right about turntables picking up room sounds. My turntables are in the basement, on a concrete floor, isolated from everything with damper feet. I only use headphones for monitoring during vinyl transfer.

I do this professionally. (for the broadcast industry) I have 4 different turntables that I use for different jobs. I have a Technics that is optimized for 45s, another Technics that is optimized for LPs, a Thorens that is set up for 78s or 16s, and a Garrard with a modified adjustable center spindle for the "off center" 33 & 45 jobs. Depending on the job, my favorite cartridges are made by Grado, and Sumiko. I use an ATI professional pre-amp with +4dB balanced audio going into either an Audio Science, or M-Audio professional soundcard. My software of choice is Adobe Audition. I usually record at 96,000 Hz 32 bit, then de-noise, de-click, EQ, re-master as needed, then down-convert to 44,100 Hz 16 bit to burn to CD.
Bob Guest   Offline  -  Artist  -  08-05-09 08:08 PM  -  9 years ago
fiogf49gjkf0d
The problem with the cable from your old turntable into your sound card is the lost frequency range. Sound cards just don't seem to cut it if you want to get all the highs and lows. Leads us back to the USB connection of the turntable.

You can get USB interfaces that you can plug your RCA connectors into. I got one a few months ago bundled (at no extra charge) with Roxio Creator 2009. It works pretty good at inputting audio and/or video signals. Since then, I've seen the same Roxio software for more money (now about $90 Canadian) and without the USB interface. (Of course, my interface of choice is still the Behringer Podcastudio.)

My major setback right now is my turntables. They are all biting the dust. My favourite has a stretched belt... another has a worn out gear... yet another has just quit for no apparent reason. I have one left that I haven't tried. It was made in 1963 and (surprisingly) has never been used. At least the parts won't be worn... and it has a 78 needle in perfect condition. (I hope there are no belts.)

Some USB turntables I have looked at also have RCA inputs, so you can record your tapes through the same USB interface. That would be a nice optional extra for some people.
Tim P. Ryan   Offline  -  Participant, MP3  -  08-05-09 01:21 PM  -  9 years ago
fiogf49gjkf0d
You might also be able to find a 20 to 30 foot cord with RCA connections on the end, a converter to 1/8th inch ring-tip-sleeve stereo plug, running it between your current steroe system and computer. The cord could cost from $20 to $30.

The Audacity editior is free from their site and comes in many flavors needed (Windows, Mac, unix). My computer came with Sound Forge, so I learned how to use that.

There is an All CD Covers site out there with much of the art, that does include some LP only art.

One of things I learned about transfering from LP to WAV to CD and MP3 is to know that no matter how stable a table I think my turntable is on, it will pick up foot steps, and acoustic feedback from speakers. In the recording you can see the footsteps, but a low pass graphic EQ should deminish those.
I record whole sides but break that into individual tracks. It allows me to shorten the time between tracks. I also fade-up from total silence to the start of the track within 1/3 second. It seems to be better for my MP3 player and let's you fade-up the inherant noise (hiss from tapes, track noise from records), which gives the ear a break. My fade-outs are usually 2/3rds second again to go to zero bits silence. This should keep your ears from being jolted by fade-out with some noise then snap to zero-bit silence and back again. I heard that on a professionally recovered cassette tape to CD release and it does get to the ears.
Bob Guest   Offline  -  Artist  -  08-05-09 12:58 PM  -  9 years ago
fiogf49gjkf0d
There are actually several manufacturers of turntables that take care of digital conversion. It's very likely that they are available in most well stocked electronics stores. Best to shop around and check out the specs, since they are not all created equal.


MarlinsGirl:
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I don't have any vinyl to speak of, but there is this gadget that might work, www.thinkgeek.com/electronics/digital-conversion/90a0/
MarlinsGirl   Offline  -  Participant  -  08-05-09 07:38 AM  -  9 years ago
fiogf49gjkf0d
I don't have any vinyl to speak of, but there is this gadget that might work, www.thinkgeek.com/electronics/digital-conversion/90a0/

Dbdash2000:
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The only one I can seem to find that doesn't cost my first born is Perfect/Near Perfect. Does anyone have any of the others? I've got all of them on LP, but I would like to get digital versions. Is there a good way that some of you guys use to transfer vinyl to CD or MP3?
Dbdash2000   Offline  -  Member  -  08-04-09 11:59 PM  -  9 years ago
fiogf49gjkf0d
The only one I can seem to find that doesn't cost my first born is Perfect/Near Perfect. Does anyone have any of the others? I've got all of them on LP, but I would like to get digital versions. Is there a good way that some of you guys use to transfer vinyl to CD or MP3?

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